Academic Books of the Month

  • Legacies of the Portuguese Colonial Empire
    Decolonization represented the end of colonial rule, but did not eradicate imperial and colonial categories and mythologies. Situated in the wider context of European colonial legacies, this book looks at the legacies of the Portuguese empire in today's Portugal.
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  • Franco’s Soldiers
    The coup d'etat of July 1936 split Spain in two, shaping a chessboard of terror, misery and death that would put an end to the Republic and give sustenance to dictatorship. In the rebel territory, Franco's soldiers were often not convinced followers, but mere pawns forced to fight for the future of a Spain in which the only element of cohesion would be fear. The experience of the Spanish Civil War is defined by how the dictator placed citizens before a terrible dilemma: become executioners or die.
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  • The Prado Museum Expansion
    From 2001 to 2007, the world-renowned Prado Museum in Madrid, Spain, underwent an ambitious expansion project that reorganized the museum’s spatial design and significantly increased the available exhibition space. Coinciding with the completion of this large construction project was a series of celebrations surrounding the 2010 bicentenary of South American independence movements, a clear reminder of the complicated relationship between Spain and its former colonies in Latin America. Inspired by this significant historical moment and with an eye to diversifying its predominantly Spanish-centered permanent collection, the Prado Museum decides to host a competition for a new gallery of Latin American art.
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  • The Power of the Image in the Work of Lídia Jorge
    Radiating from the initial image, Lídia Jorge manages to develop a gaze which is simultaneously critical, thorough and informative. Scholars point out that whenever language opens to universal images and mythologies capable of conveying visions of clarity, the subversive power of beauty is re-asserted. This power is confirmed and examined from different points of view and theories in this volume.
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  • Rebels with a Cause in Contemporary Spanish Women Playwriting
    This book examines a selection of plays from four innovative women playwrights of the first two decades of 21st century Spain. By foregrounding female characters as the subjects and protagonists of their plays, Mar Gómez Glez, Carolina África, Lucía Miranda, and Marta Buchaca reinscribe the stage as a space for the productive exploration of female autonomy and individuation.
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  • Popular Culture, Identity, and Politics in Contemporary Catalonia
    Grounded in ethnographic research, this edited collection examines the intersections between grassroots culture, local identities, and the politics of catalanisme and independentisme from the end of the Francoist period to the present day.
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  • The Portuguese Restoration of 1640 and Its Global Visualization
    The Portuguese Restoration of 1640 ended the dynastic union of Portugal and Spain. This book pioneers in reconstructing the global image discourse related to the event by bringing together visualizations from three decades and four continents. These include paintings, engravings, a statue, coins, emblems, miniatures, a miraculous crosier and other regalia, buildings, textiles, a castrum doloris, drawings, and ivory statues.
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  • Spanish Meta-Art and Contemporary Cinema
    Can cinema reveal its audience's most subversive thinking? Do films have the potential to project their viewers' innermost thoughts making them apparent on the screen? This book argues that cinema has precisely this power, to unveil to the spectator their own hidden thoughts. It examines case studies from various cultures in conversation with Spain, a country whose enduring masterpieces in self-reflexive or meta-art provide insight into the special dynamic between viewer and screen.
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